News & Analysis: Madagascar

Madagascar: World Bank Provides $75 Million to Mitigate the Impacts of COVID-19 and Support Recovery

“The Madagascar COVID-19 Response Development Policy Financing will help close a financing gap caused by the COVID-19 crisis while supporting key reforms to reinforce the effectiveness and transparency of the government’s crisis response and to lay the foundation for sustained and resilient recovery.”

via World Bank

Madagascar: World Bank Provides $75 Million to Mitigate the Impacts of COVID-19 and Support Recovery

“The World Bank Board of Directors recently approved a US$75 million development policy operation for Madagascar to mitigate the impact of the COVID-19 crisis. The operation will help close a financing gap caused by the COVID-19 crisis while supporting key reforms to reinforce the effectiveness and transparency of the government’s crisis response.”

via World Bank

The AfCFTA’s effects on trade and wages in Africa

“AfCFTA, if implemented fully, could boost regional income by $450 billion, bring 30 million people out of extreme poverty, and raise the incomes of 68 million others who live on less than $5.50 a day.”

via Brookings Institution

Madagascar president’s herbal tonic fails to halt COVID-19 spike

“Hospitals in Madagascar have been struggling to cope with a surge of COVID-19 cases, while the president has been promoting an unproven product he says can cure the disease despite the World Health Organization (WHO) warning against using untested remedies.”

via BBC

The promise of digitising cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa during COVID-19 and beyond

“This year, the coronavirus pandemic has forced governments to grapple with difficult questions regarding lockdowns, contact tracing and the provision of emergency financial assistance to citizens now without work. In developing countries, these hardships are magnified with the World Bank estimating that remittances – money transfers sent from foreign workers to their home countries – to low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are projected to fall by 19.7 percent (from $554 billion in 2019 to $445 billion in 2020). Considering the significant role that remittances play in alleviating poverty and improving nutrition, many governments have turned to mobile cash transfers for vulnerable citizens to use while minimising COVID-19 exposure.”

via Africa Portal

IMF Executive Board Approves an Additional US$171.9 Million Disbursement Under the RCF to Madagascar to Address the COVID-19 Pandemic

“The Executive Board of the International Monetary Fund today approved the disbursement of $171.9 million to the Republic of Madagascar… This is the second emergency disbursement since the onset of the pandemic and will help finance the country’s urgent balance of payments and fiscal needs.”

via IMF

Madagascar govt split over minister’s call for int’l help to fight COVID-19

“Cracks are appearing in Madagascar’s government after its health minister requested international help to cope with a surge in COVID-19 cases despite an official campaign to promote a touted fix for the virus.”

via Vanguard (Nigeria)

African Development Fund approves UA100.4 million multi-country COVID-19 Response Support for Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique and Sao Tome

“The Board of Directors of the African Development Fund on Wednesday approved a UA100.4 million (about $138 million) crisis budget support package to four southern African countries – Malawi, Madagascar, Mozambique and São Tomé & Príncipe, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.”

via AfDB

Coronavirus: Madagascar hospitals ‘overwhelmed’

“Hospitals in Madagascar have warned they are overwhelmed after a spike in coronavirus cases in a country where the president has been promoting a herbal drink to treat the virus.”

via BBC

Why the attack on civil liberties in Africa is a matter of life and death

“Given that many African governments performed comparatively well in terms of restricting the spread of the virus, one might not expect the pandemic to have increased political pressure on the media. Yet many governments that have taken the disease seriously have also sought to evade scrutiny by undermining press freedom and civil liberties.”

via African Arguments