News & Analysis: Mali

COVID-19 in Africa: Is the crisis over? Or has it just begun?

“Despite progress in vaccine research, we expect the economic effects of COVID-19 to linger in African countries for a long time to come. It’s time for the entire international community to take these more seriously.”

via Development Reimagined

The promise of digitising cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa during COVID-19 and beyond

“This year, the coronavirus pandemic has forced governments to grapple with difficult questions regarding lockdowns, contact tracing and the provision of emergency financial assistance to citizens now without work. In developing countries, these hardships are magnified with the World Bank estimating that remittances – money transfers sent from foreign workers to their home countries – to low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are projected to fall by 19.7 percent (from $554 billion in 2019 to $445 billion in 2020). Considering the significant role that remittances play in alleviating poverty and improving nutrition, many governments have turned to mobile cash transfers for vulnerable citizens to use while minimising COVID-19 exposure.”

via Africa Portal

Financial, development and humanitarian arms provide $20 million to curb the impact of COVID-19 on refugees and their hosts in the Sahel

“Public health, the wellbeing of refugees and the host communities in the Sahel are at the heart of the latest tripartite agreement between the African Development Bank, UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency and the G5 Sahel signed today. The agreement enables a critical $20 million COVID-19 response across the five countries of the Sahel region.”

via AfDB

COVID-19 and the challenge of African borderlands

“Borderlands are especially vulnerable to the negative impacts of disease control measures, in particular those that restrict movement and hinder informal trade. In the haste to combat the disease, these measures are not always justified by an analysis of the trade-offs between protecting public health and ensuring that people are able to meet their basic food and protection needs.”

via UNDP

COVID-19: African Development Bank mobilizes $22 million for low-income ECOWAS countries

“The Bank is making $22.4 million available for the project, approved by the Board on May 22. Part of the funding, $9.55 million, will provide screening tests, laboratory equipment, ventilators and personal protective equipment for medical personnel in the three countries. The remaining $12.83 million will be used to strengthen and integrate the health systems of Gambia, Mali and Niger to better address the pandemic.”

via AfDB

Africa can build back better after COVID-19

“Economies and livelihoods have been heavily affected as the demand for Africa’s commodities has fallen and tourism has declined sharply. Remittances — which can account for more than 10% of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) — are also drying up.”

via Mail & Guardian

COVID-19: When saving fewer lives is the right thing to do

“The COVID-19 pandemic has presented a difficult ethical choice to medics around the world. When you can’t save everyone, who do you prioritise?”

via The New Humanitarian

African nations join forces to procure medical equipment

“African countries are developing a platform to pool orders to break into the global diagnostics and medical equipment market they have largely been shut out of during the coronavirus pandemic, according to the head of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.”

via Financial Times

Meeting Africa’s urgent liquidity needs while protecting its access to international markets

“A solution to finance Africa’s commercial debt service could free up over $44bn of fiscal space for Africa in 2020, providing immediate liquidity to governments – a much needed immediate bridge to renewed growth for Africa and the global economy.”

via New African Magazine

The global child mortality rate could rise for the first time in more than 60 years, experts warn

“Fear is another lethal hazard of this pandemic, blocking the youngest patients from basic care as everyday medical appointments grind to a halt across Africa, South America and southeast Asia. Such disruptions could fuel the first rise in the global child mortality rate since doctors began tracking it in 1960, according to a report published Tuesday in the Lancet Global Health journal.”

via Washington Post