Remittances during COVID-19: Reduce costs to save livelihoods

“As COVID-19 continues to affect the global economy, remittances become more important than ever before to prevent large-scale poverty and starvation. However, a drop in migrants’ wages and employment, fall in tourism, and restrictions on the movement of people, goods and services will likely cause remittances to decline this year.”

via Development Matters (OECD)

Ethiopia’s Response to COVID-19

“Ethiopia is one of the countries that put bold measures in place early on, even though its approach has been an unconventional one. Unlike most African countries, Ethiopia did not introduce national lockdown. The country’s ‘sustained moderate to strong measures’ strategy focused on taking bold measures early and scaling them up gradually.”

via Development Matters (OECD)

Repurposing Africa’s manufacturing: A means to address medical equipment shortages and spur industrialisation

“In Africa, repurposing may not only help address immediate shortages in medical supplies but may also help ensure a revenue source for factories to keep workers employed while paving the way to accelerate the continent’s industrialisation agenda.”

via Development Matters (OECD)

Driving Africa’s industrialisation on the back of COVID-19

“The impact COVID-19 is having on global supply chains and on global trade, and the immense economic pressure this is placing on Africa – not least in the availability of medical equipment, but also food and other goods – signals the importance of industrialising the continent.”

via Development Matters (OECD)

Accelerating the response to COVID-19: what does Africa need?

“The pandemic magnifies the continent’s structural weaknesses, which make self-isolation and lockdown measures costly and hard to implement: 60% of the world’s poorest people live in Africa and the majority of the workforce is informal. The digital gap hampers telework and automation and governments are not able to mobilise investments at the scale needed to secure all citizens.”

via Development Matters (OECD)