News & Analysis: Cameroon

Is the Worst of Africa’s COVID-19 Outbreak Over?

“‘Quite early in in the evolution of the pandemic on the continent, governments quickly implemented restrictions on movement and gatherings; so-called ‘lockdowns’ and this, we think, created a window of opportunity to keep the case numbers low and to strengthen public health capacities,’ says WHO Regional Director for Africa Dr. Matshidiso Moeti.”

via AllAfrica

IDA: Securing a more resilient future in fragile and conflict-affected settings

“Under the 18th replenishment of IDA, which ended in June, the World Bank has more than doubled its support in fragile and conflict-affected situations over three years, from $10.2 billion to $23 billion. Thanks to this, over 38 million people have accessed essential health services, more than 15 million children have been immunized, and over 17 million people have benefitted from social safety net programs.”

via World Bank

Cameroon’s twin crises create surge in teen pregnancy

“The lives of many young women have been impacted by not one but two crises: COVID-19 and the ongoing conflict in Cameroon’s Anglophone regions. In Douala, the worsening economy and the closure of schools has forced many young women to turn to sex work to make ends meet, or made them vulnerable to exploitative men.”

via Mail & Guardian

Cameroon’s multi-pronged strategy to beat COVID-19-induced slump

“In order to counter the downturn, Yaoundé has announced plans to get the economy back on its feet: both in the short term through financial support for businesses, and longer term by strengthening trade with the rest of the world.”

via New African Magazine

Africa’s top 10 COVID-19 hotspots face virus storm

“The World Health Organisation has warned that the coronavirus pandemic could overwhelm already strained public health systems in Africa. Despite considerable investments in the past five months, Africa’s healthcare infrastructure remains gravely inadequate. The average doctor to patient ratio of 1:5,000 is still far short of the World Health Organisation (WHO) recommended proportion of 1:1,000.”

via The East African

The promise of digitising cash transfers in sub-Saharan Africa during COVID-19 and beyond

“This year, the coronavirus pandemic has forced governments to grapple with difficult questions regarding lockdowns, contact tracing and the provision of emergency financial assistance to citizens now without work. In developing countries, these hardships are magnified with the World Bank estimating that remittances – money transfers sent from foreign workers to their home countries – to low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are projected to fall by 19.7 percent (from $554 billion in 2019 to $445 billion in 2020). Considering the significant role that remittances play in alleviating poverty and improving nutrition, many governments have turned to mobile cash transfers for vulnerable citizens to use while minimising COVID-19 exposure.”

via Africa Portal

Why African countries are reluctant to take up COVID-19 debt relief

“Of the 25 countries eligible for the debt relief, only four have requested assistance – Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Ethiopia and Senegal. The majority have either refused to apply, or have not yet requested a debt moratorium.”

via The Conversation

Coronavirus stalks cells of Cameroon’s crowded prisons

“Hundreds of cases of COVID-19 were recorded among the inmates released from five prisons dotted across Cameroon’s central region in April, according to government data seen by Reuters which has not been made public.”

via Reuters

The Day After COVID-19: Overcoming the Novel Coronavirus double jeopardy in Central Africa

“Central Africa countries announced various stimulus packages to alleviate the impact of the crisis on the population and on the economy. However, those measures had only redistributive impacts in the very short term, without significant effect on the overall production level.”

via CNBC Africa

Cameroon hospitals turn to telemedicine as patients flee over COVID-19 scare

“Some health facilities in Cameroon are turning to telemedicine as patients have been keeping away from and fleeing medical facilities for fear of contracting the coronavirus COVID-19.”

via The East African